You are here: Home : Search : Search Results : Detailed Result
  |   Print  

ANDERTON BOAT LIFT

DESCRIPTION + /

The Anderton Boat Lift transfers canal boats between the Weaver Navigation and the Trent and Mersey Canal through a 50' 4" difference in water level. At the top level the lift is linked to the canal by means of a 162 foot long aqueduct which has twin channels. The lift was originally operated by water pressure; the two caissons were supported on 3 feet diameter rams working in the cylinders of the hydraulic presses, which were linked through valves. The caissons were of wrought iron, being 75 feet long and 16 feet and 6 inches wide, with gates at each end. By 1904 the lift, which was opened in 1875, needed overhauling and the main rams required renewing. It was therefore converted to a counterbalance structure driven by electric motors, with the caissons suspended from wire ropes carrying cast-iron weights, some 252 tons to each caisson. The lift, which is constructed of wrought and cast iron, was designed by Sir Edward Leader Williams, Edwin Clark and J W Sanderson, and was the forerunner of several similar lifts constructed in Europe.

PICTURES + / -
DETAIL + / -
MORE INFORMATION & SOURCES
+ / -
RELATED MONUMENTS + / -
MONUMENT TYPES + / -
COMMENTS + / -
Please help us keep our information accurate let us know if you see any errors on this page.

Further information about monuments may be obtained by contacting Archive Services, through the Historic England website.