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HYDE VALE CONDUIT

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The Hyde Vale conduit is an underground tunnel, constructed of brick, built to carry water to the Standard Reservoir in Greenwich Park. Originally, the conduit ran south-westwards towards a conduit head at the top of Hyde Vale (see TQ 37 NE 87), but subsequently blocking has reduced its length to just under 250m. The surviving stretch runs from the Conduit House (TQ 37 NE 38) to the lower end of Hyde Vale and was mapped underground using tapes and a prismatic compass, tied into OS mapping on the surface using the positions of vertical air shafts.

The Hyde Vale conduit is probably to be dated to c. 1695, when an existing conduit system was refurbished to supply the Royal Hospital (see TQ 37 NE 86). Since then, the conduits must have been repaired on frequent occasions, as the mixture of brick bonds testifies. The roof may be a separate construction to the tunnel, since in several places the wall is slightly recessed where the vault begins. Iron pipes running along the base of the side walls are certainly later additions, documented to the early nineteenth century.

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