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BAINBRIDGE ROMAN FORT

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  VIROSIDUM, VIROSIDVM
DESCRIPTION + /

The site of a Roman fort at Brough Hill, Bainbridge. Earthwork remains are visible of the Roman fort and fort annexe. The fort was probably Flavian, and the annexe, possibly containing a bath house, Severan in date. The fort was first excavated by Kirk and Collingwood in 1925-6, then by Droop for Liverpool University in 1928-9 and 1931. Under lease to Leeds University, further excavations were directed by Wade in 1950-3 and by Hartley annually from 1956 to 1969. Almost no stonework is visible within the fort, although the fort platform survives to a maximum height of 3.90m. A single ditch surrounds the north, east, and south sides, while on the west side there are the intermittent remains of five ditches. The scarps in the interior of the fort are likely to be almost exclusively the result of 20th century excavations. The fort annexe is not as well preserved as the fort itself, but is still clearly visible. It is of slightly irregular shape and measures 99 metres north-south by 73 metres east-west at its greatest, between the crests of the ramparts. Traces of a single ditch survive on the east side, where there is also probably a single entrance. The interior is marked by low amorphous scarps. The circular enclosure noted by Authority 8 is probably the remains of a post-medieval sheep shelter. The cultivation terraces described have been recorded as a separate monument. The west ditches of the fort are overlain by two probable medieval pillow mounds.

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