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CHURCH OF ST MANACCA

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  CHURCH OF ST MENACUS AND ST DUNSTAN, CHURCH OF ST MENACCUS, CHURCH OF ST MENNACCUS
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The parish church of St. Manacca was named 'Ecclesia de Ministre' about 1260, which appears to be the Saxon equivalent of the Celtic Manaccan, i.e. 'the Monks' Church'. The ancient name shows it originally to have been a Celtic monastery, the dedication to St. Manacca being a late medieval creation; the name is also found as St. Menaccus or St. Menaccus. The church stands in an oval churchyard interpreted as a 'lan' or site indicating a centre of early Christian religious activity. The present building largely dates to the 14th and 15th centuries. Parts of the church, the south doorway, southern half of the nave and transept date to the 12th century. The church during this period had a cruciform plan. Construction of the tower began during the 14th century and was completed in the 15th century, as was the north aisle. The vestry is dated to the 19th century. The church is listed Grade I, and is also said to contain the bell from the wreck of the BAY OF PANAMA, lost nearby in 1891 [SW 82 SW 24].

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