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MILTON CHANTRY

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  MILTON CHANTRY HERITAGE CENTRE, HOSPITAL OF ST MARY THE VIRGIN
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The Chantry chapel, all that remains of the leper hospital of Milton which was founded by 1155, and refounded by Aymer de Valence, Earl of Pembroke in 1321. It became a chantry in 1524. The chantry is a long, rectangular, stone-walled building which still retains its original 14th century arch-braced roof. A timber-framed building runs out at right angles from the south wall of the chantry. This was the priests' house which contains part of an aisled hall along with a queen post roof. By 1540, following dissolution, the building had come into domestic use, and in the late 17th century it was used as a tavern. In 1780 the building was incorporated into the property of the New Tavern Fort as part of the barracks. Whilst in use as a barracks, both the chantry and priests' house were encased in brick during the 19th century. The chantry was sold to Gravesend Council by the War Department in 1930, and during the Second World War the basement was prepared as a gas decontamination centre in anticipation of gas warefare. The property is in the care of English Heritage.

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