You are here: Home : Search : Search Results : Detailed Result
  |   Print  

LONDON WALL

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  ROMAN WALL, ROMAN TOWN WALL
DESCRIPTION + /

London Wall, as it is known, comprises remains of a stretch of the Roman wall which once formed part of the eastern defences of Roman Londinium. The wall defined the shape and size of London for over a millennium. Built in around AD 200, this is the best preserved stretch of the wall, although the upper part is medieval rebuilding. It is located on the east side of Trinity Place. The clearance of modern ruins, down to basement level, uncovered the Roman wall with its courses of bonding tiles. At one point a considerable amount of the internal Roman face has survived, consisting of six courses of squared ragstone above a triple bonding-course of tiles; then comes a double bonding-course, above which are five more courses of squared ragstone. An engraving of 1852 shows the external face, with plinth, several courses of squared ragstone and the bonding-course of brick. The overall length of wall displayed (including the medieval rebuilding) is about 38 metres, up to a height of nearly 11 metres.

The lower, Roman, part of the wall had an inner rampart and external ditch. The foundations of a Roman turret have been identified in this section, although these are no longer visible. The turret probably contained a staircase providing access to a sentry walk. The height of the Roman wall was approximately 6.4 metres. During the medieval period the wall was repaired and raised further in height. From the 17th century it fell into disuse and parts were demolished. However this section was preserved by being incorporated into later buildings. This accounts for the lack of facing on the south of the outer wall face. An interpretation panel marks the findspot of the famous inscription to Classicianus, Procurator after the Boudiccan revolt, circa 65 AD. The wall is in the care of English Heritage.

PICTURES + / -
DETAIL + / -
MORE INFORMATION & SOURCES
+ / -
RELATED MONUMENTS + / -
MONUMENT TYPES + / -
COMMENTS + / -
Please help us keep our information accurate let us know if you see any errors on this page.

Further information about monuments may be obtained by contacting Archive Services, through the Historic England website.