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CHURCH OF ST ALPHAGE LONDON WALL

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The shells of the 14th century crossing tower and north transept, gutted by bombing, still stand. They are the remains of the priory church of Elsing Spital, founded in 1331 as a hospital for the blind staffed by secular priests, and taken over by Augustinian Canons in 1340. There are two plain arches to the west and north with a similar, but lower, arch in the north transept of the west wall. The east crossing arch is also lower, of three orders with quarter-round mouldings, framing a segment-headed doorway with a cusped niche on the inside. This may have screened the canons' chapel to its east from the hospital space, which was possibly in the nave itself. The rest, demolished in 1923, comprised work of 1775-7 by William Hillyer, with a pedimented east front to the old line of Aldermanbury, and a lesser front on to London Wall. The old parish church proper, abandoned at the Reformation in favour of the vacated priory, was built on the line of the City Wall to the north.

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