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CHAPEL OF THE HOSPITAL OF ST JOHN THE BAPTIST

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  DUXFORD CHAPEL
DESCRIPTION + /

The Chapel of the Hospital of St John the Baptist is a small rectangular chapel which mostly dates to around 1337 and was built using flint rubble for the walls and limestone for the doorways and windows. Some sections of the building, including a small part of the southern wall, are considered to date from its 13th century predecessor, which formed part of a hospital. The chapel is a single storey building, measuring approximately 20 metres east to west and 6.5 metres north to south, and comprises a chancel and nave with no structural division. The main entrance, a two centred archway with quarter round mouldings, is located near the western end of the north wall. There are two similar doorways in the south wall, one directly opposite the main entrance, the other (a priest's door) located towards the eastern end. The north wall is pierced by four windows, dated to circa 1330-1360, each containing a single light with tracery of trefoil design. The four windows on the southern side are of similar date and design, although each formerly contained two lights divided by a central mullion.

In 1548 the chapel was suppressed during the dissolution of chantries in the reign of Edward VI and sometime after 1554 the chapel was used as a barn.

A porch attached to the northern entrance was demolished in the 19th century, with its foundations surviving as buried features. The area to the north of the chapel is considered to contain further remains, including burials and yard surfaces connecting the hospital with the former course of the road.


The chapel was acquired and restored by the Ministry of Works in 1947-54 and is currently (2010) under the guardianship of English Heritage.

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Further information about monuments may be obtained by contacting Archive Services, through the Historic England website.