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AYSCOUGHFEE HALL

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  MUSEUM OF SOUTH HOLLAND LIFE
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Ayscoughfee Hall has developed from a substantial high status mid 15th century open hall, with 17th century and 18th century alterations, including extensive remodelling between 1781 and 1808. Alterations of circa 1834 is thought to be the work of William Todd. In 1898 the house and its grounds were sold to a committee of Spalding citizens to serve as a permanent reminder of Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee. It was also the Committee’s intent that the Hall and Gardens should be held in trust for the establishment of a museum, however it was not until 1987 that a museum, the Museum of South Holland Life, was opened. Prior to this the Hall was used as a school, public library and from 1953 housed the Ashley Maples collection of British Birds. This exhibition remained on display until the museum was closed for refurbished between 2003-2006.

The building has a modified H-shaped plan formed around the original open hall and its cross-wings with major extensions to the north cross-wing and a small addition to the south cross-wing. It is constructed of brick, much of which is medieval, with ashlar stone dressings, crenellated parapets, tall brick ridge chimneys and slate roofs.

Ayscoughfee Hall is a Grade I listed building. For the designation record of this site please see the National Heritage List for England.

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Further information about monuments may be obtained by contacting Archive Services, through the Historic England website.