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NEWTON ON TRENT ROMAN FORT

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The site of a Roman vexillation fortress with defensive outworks at Newton on Trent. It was discovered in 1962, and probably dates from the Claudian period. The fort was discovered in the course of reconnaissance of the Trent valley in 1962 when the ditch-system on part of the north and east sides was visible. The site lies 9 1/2 miles west of Lincoln, at the north end of a ridge that rises to a height of some 70 ft on the east bank of the Trent. This is the highest ground close to the river for several miles and commands extensive views. Outside the fort to the east a number crop marks probably represents two temporary camps. Three sides of the double-ditched vexillation fortress are known; the fourth west side, if such existed, has been lost to river erosion. The area enclosed is likely to have been at least 12 ha (30 acres). There was a defensive outwork comprising a polygonal envelope of ditches on the three sides, with perhaps a simple gate on the north and south sides; on the east a more complex system, with staggered entrances, is discernible.

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