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TYNEMOUTH PRIORY AND CASTLE

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A multi-period site including the remains of an Iron Age and Romano-British settlement, a pre-conquest monastery from the 8th century, a post-conquest monastery dedicated to St. Oswine, built from about 1090 with subsequent multiple phases of development in the Medieval period and a large 14th century gatehouse; a ninth century wayside cross, a possible Norman motte, an enclosure castle, an artillery castle and 19th and 20th century coastal defences. They occupy a prominent headland with steep cliffs on three sides. This is an important strategic position at the mouth of the River Tyne where, from the earliest times, it could command the mouth of the river, and indeed the site is known to have been occupied from the Iron Age onwards. The monument is in the care of English Heritage on behalf of the Secretary of State. Please see the individual records for the components of this monument.

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