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ABINGDON ABBEY

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Norman and later Benedictine monastery, one of the most important monastic centres in England. Built on the site of an earlier minster and Benedictine monastery, (see SU59NW 166). Following the collapse of the central tower in 1091, the church was rebuilt, and the fromer monastic buildings demolished and rebuilt. The abbey was suppressed in 1538. Trial excavations located the great church built in the Norman period from 1091-1120. Robbing after the Disssolution had been so extensive that even the foundations were removed. Reconstruction of the plan from the original excavation notes shows the church to have been aisled with transepts and arectangular chancel. However, much detail is still uncertain. The cloister and monastic buildings were arranged to the South of the church. Abbey buildings extant include the late 13th or early 14th century guesthouse, and the late 15th century gatehouse. Dependencies: Earls Colne, Edwardstone, Milton (Oxon), the Hospital of St John, (Abingdon), and it owned Charney Grange.

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