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TROUGHEND HALL

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  TROUGHEND TOWER, TROUGHEN HALL
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The site of a pele tower built in the 14th century by William Butecom. The Reed family acquired Troughend Tower soon after 1415, and it served them well throughout a turbulent period of raids. It was replaced with a hall house in circa 1716 by Elrington Reed, possibly in front of a much older brewhouse and kitchen which were thought to have been kept in use.
The house had fallen into ruin by the early 20th century and photographs show it in a run-down state during the Second World War. There is a report that the house burnt down in 1952, however a photograph of 1956 shows it still to be standing though in poor repair. Although there are no standing remains of the site, large foundation blocks were discovered during drainage work and there is a piece of stonework in the farmyard today (2011).
The precise site of the tower may be represented by a small wood at the roadside. A modern house now occupies the former site of the hall.

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