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HALLIWICK SCHOOL FOR GIRLS

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  HALLIWICK HOME FOR CRIPPLED GIRLS
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Halliwick School for Girls, which was also formally known as Halliwick Home for Crippled Girls, is located in Bush Hill Road, Enfield, Greater London and was designed by an unknown architect at an unknown date.

An organisation that specialised in caring for children with disabilities, The Cripples and Industrial School as it was then known, was established in 1851 by Miss Caroline Blunt. Its name was later changed to Halliwick Home which was later transferred to the Children’s Society in 1927. The Home was first established at Marylebone Road where it remained for sixty years until 1911 when the building relocated to Winchmore Hill on Bush Hill Road where it opened in 1927.

At its opening the Home took on 56 girls aged between 8-16. Education was provided as well as skills such as embroidery, needlework and dressmaking. The girls would also attend Guides or Brownies and the Winchmore Guide Company was the first disabled guide to be formed.

The Home was relocated in 1939 to Halliwick Home for Girls in Essex due to the effects of the Second World War and was re-opened again in 1945. In 1973 the Home began to take on boys as well as girls in a plan to establish accommodation for young people up to 18 years of age. A new Education Unit was built in 1976 to provide training for young people with physical as well as learning disabilities.

The building was taken over by the Invalid Children’s Aid Association in 1984 at the request of the Children’s Society.

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