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CHAPEL OF OUR LADY HELP OF CHRISTIANS

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  OUR LADY HELP OF CHRISTIANS ROMAN CATHOLIC CHAPEL, OUR LADY HELP OF CHRISTIANS CHAPEL, OUR LADY HELP OF CHRISTIANS, ROMAN CATHOLIC CHAPEL OF OUR LADY HELP OF CHRISTIANS, PORTICO OF OUR LADY HELP OF CHRISTIANS
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A Roman Catholic chapel and presbytery built in about 1790 to the design of George Marsh of Liverpool. A Jesuit mission had been established at The Scholes in Scholes Lane by at least 1716. The present chapel was constructed shortly after Catholic church building was legalised. Our Lady Help of Christians is built of dark red brick with slate roofs, and comprises a rectangular range with the chapel and presbytery arranged back to back. The presbytery, at the east, has a polite domestic pedimented facade with round-headed sash windows under relieving arches and a central doorway with side lights and ornamental fan-light. The chapel is at the west. In the west elevation are two pointed windows with inter-lace glazing bars divided by a brick stack. In front is a fore-building originally housing a school-room. It has a pitched roof and central doorway flanked by pointed widows. In the south side of the chapel, away from the road, are three pointed windows. The north side has blind windows, originally screened by a barn. The interior is a rectangular space with a flat ceiling and an elliptical apse in the east wall set in a frame of fluted pilasters with acanthusleaf capitals. There was originally a painting of the ascension above the High Altar, and also a west gallery. The present furnishings include two altars introduced by exiled German Jesuit priests in the later 19th century. In the small garden front of the church is a stone cross dated 1652 which is thought to have stood on Eccleston Hill until 1822.

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