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WINFIELD HOUSE

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  ST DUNSTANS INSTITUTE FOR THE BLIND, ST DUNSTANS, HERTFORD VILLA
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Winfield House is a detached house situated at the northwest side of Regent's Park in London and is now residence of the Ambassador of the United States of America. It is a Regency style villa, originally named Hertford Villa but later known as St Dunstan's, and was designed by the architect Decimus Burton as part of John Nash's grand design for Regent's Park.

From 1917 until 1921 it was used by St Dunstan's Institute for the Blind and then remained empty for the rest of the 1920s. St Dunstan’s Institute for the Blind, now renamed and known as Blind Veterans UK, was established in 1915 and first located in Winfield House which was lent to the charity. The establishment was founded by Sir Arthur Pearson who owned the Evening Standard and founded the Daily Express. He lost his sight through glaucoma and wanted to help those who had lost their vision in the First World War by providing care and rehabilitation.

In 1936 the building was partly destroyed by fire and it was bought by the Woolworth heiress Barbara Hutton who demolished it and built a red brick Georgian style house in its place. This was designed by Leonard Rome Guthrie of Wimperis, Simpson and Guthrie with Johnny Sieben and Sheila Lady Milbank as interior decorators. The building was named Winfield House after Barbara Hutton's grandfather and it was her home from 1937 until 1939. During the Second World War the building was commandeered and used by an RAF barrage balloon unit and an Air Crew Reception Centre, later it was used as an American Officers' Club. In 1946 Barbara Hutton gave the house to the United States Government to be used as the official residence of the American Ambassador.

The building lies in a Conservation Area.

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