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BENSON COURT

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Benson Court at Magdalene College (Monument HOB UID 371524) is situated within Magdalene Village, an area of student accomodation for the college which includes Mallory Court (Monument HOB UID 1320421) and Buckingham Court (Monument HOB UID 1574338) and was initially designed by Edwin Lutyens in 1931-32. Lutyens' original plan involved the demolition of existing buildings within the proposed area and the construction of new buildings which matched the college's main site. However, this plan was not realised due to insufficient funding, the only part to be executed was the Lutyens Building, (known as Benson A-E) in Benson Court. The village gradually developed over a period of 45 years and incorporated Mallory Court and the conversion of other pre-existing buildings. Architects involved included Harry Redfern, David Roberts and Geoffrey Clarke.

Benson Court was named after Arthur Christopher Benson, Master of Magdalene College, 1915 to 1925, and writer of Land of Hope and Glory set to the tune of Edward Elgar's Pomp and Circumstance March No. 1. The Lutyens building was designed by Edwin Lutyens and built in 1931-32. It has three storeys and a long frontage, gabled at either end, and built of brick with a tiled roof. Part of the building's cost was sponsored by subscriptions raised by Harvard University in memory of Henry Dunster, who studied in Magdalene in 1627-30, and later founded Harvard University.

Further additions to Benson include two accomodation blocks designed by David Roberts and built in 1955-57, and the conversion of 16th-17th century timber-framed buildings into student accommodation during the 1960s.

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