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RED LODGE MUSEUM

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  RED LODGE
DESCRIPTION + /

Red Lodge was built c1577 to 1585 and is a remarkable late Elizabethan lodge with exceptional interiors. In 1568 the site was acquired by John Young and a mansion and Red Lodge was the garden lodge to this mansion.

It is constructed from Brandon Hill sandstone, and was originally rendered and painted a deep red. It is of 2.5-storeys with an arched loggia to the garden. It was made independent from the mansion as a dwelling in its own right by 1595 and was subsequently extended and altered in the 17th and 18th centuries.

The interior include a fully panelled Great Oak Room which is of the most elaborate interiors of its date in the country. The ceiling, fireplace and many of the panels are intricately decorated. There is also a New Oak Room - actually fitted in 1965 but with a fireplace of c1600 which came from the demolished Ashley Manor.

In 1854 Mary Carpenter acquired the building and set up the first girls' reform school in the country. The Red Lodge passed to Bristol City Council in 1948 and has been open to the public as a museum ever since.

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Further information about monuments may be obtained by contacting Archive Services, through the Historic England website.