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MURRAY EDWARDS COLLEGE

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  NEW HALL COLLEGE
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The college was founded as New Hall in 1954, and is one of the 15 'new' colleges at Cambridge University founded between 1800 and 1977. It is also the University's third woman's college, after Girton College established in 1869 (Monument HOB UID 372043) and Newnham College established in 1871 (Monument HOB UID 1314695). It was first housed in Silver Street where Darwin College now stands. By 1962 its present site in Huntingdon Road had been acquired and the architects, Chamberlin, Powell and Bon chosen. Construction started in 1964 and completed, as far as funding and land would allow, in 1965. It could house up to 300 students . The core of the college comprises a domed first floor dining room, common rooms and library, built of white brick and concrete set around a courtyard.

In 1981construction was undertaken to complete the original architectural plan of the College, and to add 112 student rooms, a lecture hall and conference facilities. In the 1990s Frank Woods and Martin Brett formalised the entrance at the east and added residential accommodation and a lecture theatre to the west. Further residential and conference facilities were added in 2001 by R.H. Partnership of Cambridge, who in 2003 also remodelled the main building and added a service wing to the dining hall.

A programme of refurbishment took place within the college between 1998-2000 and 2006-2007. Much of this work was undertaken by AC Architects Cambridge Limited.

In 2008 the college was renamed Murray Edwards College after Rosemary Murray the first President of the college, and Ros and Steve Edwards, major benefactors to the college.

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