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KINGS MEN STONE CIRCLE

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A stone circle known as the 'King's Men' which forms the focus of the Rollright Stones monument complex. The stone circle may once have consisted of over 100 stones of which 70 are still standing today. The stones are all local oolite limestone, erected in a tight circle giving the impression of a continuous wall with a narrow entrance on the south-south-east side marked by two portal stones. The circle has an internal diameter of 32 metres, and the interior appears to have been free of stone structures. The stones, along with the nearby King Stone, were surrounded in 1883 by a fence, part of which still survives. A number of stones have fallen over time whilst some of those now standing were re-erected by the landowner and others in 1882. The circle is believed to be the easternmost stone circle in England and is estimated to date to between 2500-2000 BC. Like many similar monuments, it has many folklore stories and powers attributed to it, and part excavation in the mid-1980s indicated that a slight bank was not contemporary but was of Roman or earlier date. This suggests that the site was reused in some way by the inhabitants of the settlement to the north during the Roman period.

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Further information about monuments may be obtained by contacting Archive Services, through the Historic England website.