You are here: Home : Search : Search Results : Detailed Result
  |   Print  

THE CITADEL

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  HULL CASTLE, HULL CITADEL
DESCRIPTION + /

The remains of an artillery garrison fort constructed between 1681-90, and incorporating the remains of the defences built by Henry VIII in 1541-2. The 16th century defences comprised three blockhouses inked by a curtain wall, situated on the eastern side of the River Hull. The middle blockhouse became known as Hull Castle. Between 1681-3 the Castle and South Blockhouse were repaired and incorporated into a new defensive work. The landward defences were completed in 1683-4 but it was not until 1686-90 that the defences facing the Humber were built. The Citadel enclosed a triangular area. Bastions extended from each corner, linked by curtain walls and ramparts and a moat ran around the north east and north west sides. Hull Castle lies within the northern bastion, with the South Blockhouse located towards the apex of the south western bastion. The original main gate was set in the north east curtain wall and was flanked by guard chambers which served as magazines during the Napoleonic Wars. Within the Citadel was a parade ground, with barracks on the west side and officers' quarters to the south. A number of alterations and repairs were carried out between 1804 and 1815, including the conversion of the Castle into an armoury in 1805 and the South Blockhouse into a naval store in 1806. The site was sold off in 1863 and the buildings were levelled the following year.

DETAIL + / -
MORE INFORMATION & SOURCES
+ / -
RELATED MONUMENTS + / -
MONUMENT TYPES + / -
COMMENTS + / -
Please help us keep our information accurate let us know if you see any errors on this page.

Further information about monuments may be obtained by contacting Archive Services, through the Historic England website.