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THE GRANARY

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The Granary was constructed in 1869 to designs by Ponton & Gough, and has been described as 'the most striking and piquant monument of the High Victorian age in Bristol'. It is built of red Cattybrook brick with black and white brick and limestone dressings and combines Venetian, Moorish and Byzantine architectural elements.

The building consists of seven grain floors each with a different window design, which is perhaps where the mix of styles can be best seen. The ground floor contains an arcade, with large pointed arches influenced by both Venetian and Moorish style. Floors above this have round arch windows with coloured brickwork, and some with Byzantine style pillars beneath the arches. On top of the building are distinctive and decorative swallow-tail parapets and a steep roof. Inside the building the floor joists are forcibly curved by cross-pieces to counteract the tendency of the floors to bow under the weight of grain.

The building was used as offices in the late 20th century but is now used as residential apartments and a restaurant.

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Further information about monuments may be obtained by contacting Archive Services, through the Historic England website.