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LIVERPOOL STREET STATION

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No other London terminus has had quite such a complex and contradictory history as Liverpool Street. The station lies on the northern side of the City, and exists primarily to provide suburban services for City Workers, together with trains to East Anglia. Its first part was built in 1871-5 by the Great Eastern Railway to the designs of the engineer Edward Wilson. It was a ten-platform station, L-shaped in plan, set below street level. Gothic Revival station offices fronted a four-bay train shed with an unusual cantilever truss roof. In 1892-4 eight more platforms were added beneath a roof of simpler design. In 1975 plans were announced to totally rebuild the station as part of an office complex. The more conservation-minded scheme that was eventually carried out in 1985-91 rationalized the layout of the station, when the 1894 roof was replaced by an overhead office block whilst retaining the original train shed which was extended in matching form.

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