You are here: Home : Search : Search Results : Detailed Result
  |   Print  

RICHBOROUGH ROMAN FORT

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  RUTUPIAE, RVTVPIAE, RICHBOROUGH CASTLE
DESCRIPTION + /

The site of Richborough Roman fort and associated settlement, port and roads. The site is important for its long history within Roman Britain: it was probably the landing place for the Roman invasion of 43 AD and it appears to have remained in use until the end of Roman rule. Now inland, during the Roman period the site was an island on the south side of the Wantsum Channel. The first phase of this site was a temporary camp dated to 43 AD. Part of the camp's ditches are visible as excavated features within the fort. This camp was levelled circa 53 AD and a supply base established. A large courtyard building was also found and has been interpreted has either a mansio or administrative centre. During 85-90 AD many buildings were cleared and a rectangular monument built to celebrate the conquest. The cross-shaped footings set on a rectangular foundation are still visible. During 90 to 250 AD the former supply base developed into a town, some of the buildings are visible as cropmarks. Around 250 AD the centre of the town was levelled and the great monument converted into a signal station defended by 3 closely spaced V-shaped ditches with one entrance. These are still visible as excavated features. The large courtyard building appears to have remained in use during this period and its foundations are also still visible. By 270 AD the town was deserted, the signal station levelled and a Saxon Shore fort built. The eastern side of the fort has been destroyed by erosion, but originally there were circular corner towers and rectangular interval towers. The 4th century garrison was the Legio II Augusta from Usk. The site was occupied into the 5th century and reused in Anglo-Saxon and Medieval times. It is now in the care of English Heritage.

PICTURES + / -
DETAIL + / -
MORE INFORMATION & SOURCES
+ / -
RELATED MONUMENTS + / -
MONUMENT TYPES + / -
COMMENTS + / -
Please help us keep our information accurate let us know if you see any errors on this page.

Further information about monuments may be obtained by contacting Archive Services, through the Historic England website.