You are here: Home : Search : Search Results : Detailed Result
  |   Print  

FORT ALBERT

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  CLIFF END FORT
DESCRIPTION + /

A former coastal battery of 1888 on an artificial island, originating in a coastal battery structure of 1854, and operating as an outpost of Golden Hill Fort [SZ 38 NW 44]. The fort was altered during World War II, when it was used as an anti-shipping observation tower, and closed to military use in 1957. During the 1970s and 80s it was converted to luxury flats. The foundations and superstructure are of brick with a granite base, the later additions are in blockwork or concrete; all now rendered except for the western face. The original block is a broad regular chevron in plan and is of three storeys surmounted by a warhead. Above this is a lift shaft designed to serve a smaller fourth storey of flat-roofed buildings constructed for anti-aircraft purposes. The granite base shows a descending sequence of housings for the sleepers of the Brennan torpedo launch rail, now dismantled. Fort Albert was built on an artificial island to defend the western approach to Portsmouth. It was intended to house 29 guns in four tiers, being among the last gun-towers constructed in England, but was rapidly rendered obsolete by advances in gunnery. In 1886 it was chosen as one of the UK locations for the Brennan wire-guided torpedo which had a range sufficient to close the strait. This too became obsolete, and was dismantled in 1906. Thereafter small guns only were mounted on the fort. The fort is architecturally important as a late example of its type, and historically important for having housed the former Brennan installation.

PICTURES + / -
DETAIL + / -
MORE INFORMATION & SOURCES
+ / -
RELATED MONUMENTS + / -
MONUMENT TYPES + / -
COMMENTS + / -
Please help us keep our information accurate let us know if you see any errors on this page.

Further information about monuments may be obtained by contacting Archive Services, through the Historic England website.