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CHURCH OF ALL SAINTS

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  ALL SAINTS TUDELEY, TUDELEY CHURCH
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There has been a church at Tudeley since the beginning of the seventh century, one of only four in the Weald at that time. The majority of the oldest existing fabric was built in the later medieval period, although some of the sandstone footings of the nave and tower may date from before the Norman conquest. A church at Tudeley is also mentioned in the Domesday Book under its alternative name of Tivedale. A list of incumbents hanging in the church begins in 1251.

The extant brick tower was constructed in 1765 and in 1798 the church was described as being rebuilt. In 1871-5 Robert Medley Fulford rebuilt the nave and added the north aisle, and in 1885 the chancel arch was constructed. Some alterations were carried out in 1967 that were associated with the re-glazing of the church windows designed by Marc Chagall, of which there are twelve in total. The earliest window was installed in 1967 and commissioned by Sir Henry and Lady d'Avigdor-Goldsmid to commemorate their daughter, who was drowned in a sailing accident.

The plan of the church is of a chancel, nave, and west tower, with a three-bay north aisle and south porch. The chancel and the part of nave below sill level are built from sandstone while the tower and upper section of the nave are built from brick. The chancel has angle buttresses and a round-headed east window. The nave is symmetrical with 19th century brick buttresses and the south porch is gabled.

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Further information about monuments may be obtained by contacting Archive Services, through the English Heritage website.