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ST PEGAS CHURCH

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This uniquely dedicated church consists of an aisled nave and an aisleless chancel, with a small north chapel. The north arcade of the nave is of well-developed Norman work, the south arcade is Early English and the chancel arch is of an intermediate transitional style. It is, however, clear that the fabric of the nave through which these arches have been cut is of Late-Saxon date. The southeast quoin of the nave is a good example of long-and-short work, and the Anglo-Saxon date is further confirmed by the long, narrow proportions of the nave and its very thin walls. Restored in 1848 and 1853. The dedication to St Pega, (died 719), sister of St Guthlac, is unique, and traditionally she is said to have founded a community at Peakirk. It is thought that the church at Peakirk attained the status of a minster. Between 1053 and 1065 Peakirk monastery was united with Crowland Abbey, and the church became its possession.

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