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ROMANO-BRITISH VILLA AT WITHINGTON

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The villa at Withington is the site of a Romano-British corridor villa discovered in 1811during ploughing. It is located to the south of Withington village together with a second Romano-British building/villa complex (see HOB UID 327689). The excavations in 1811 and 2006 revealed remains of a villa orientated roughly east to west. The villa is a tripartite corridor building with fifteen rooms. Remains included limestone walls, eight mosaics (the so called 'Orpheus mosaic' was donated to the British Museum) and a hypocaust system. Burnt timber, melted lead and discoloured pavements indicated destruction by fire. Other finds include, tile fragments, pottery, a knife and a hoard of over 1200 late 3rd cent and 4th cent coins, from Valerian to Diocletian (AD 253-305). In 2006 magnetometer survey located the remains of a series of linear features to the east of the villa which have been interpreted as a walled-courtyard.

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