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PEVERIL CASTLE

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  THE CASTLE OF THE PEAK, CASTLETON CASTLE, PEVERIL
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Peveril Castle, also known as Peveril or Castleton Castle, comprises the ruins of a medieval keep and associated buildings predominantly dating from the 11th to the 14th century. Construction of the castle began sometime between 1066 and 1086. Among the first of the Norman castles to be built in England after the Conquest, the land was granted to William Peveril, who was thought to have been an illegitimate son of William I and one of his most trusted knights. The castle stands in an impregnable position on a cliff top above the town of Castleton, but predates the town by about 100 years. The square keep and part of the curtain wall are still standing and the outer bailey is still visible. Part of the north wall dates from the 11th century, but the remainder is 12th to 14th century. The castle fell into disuse during the early 15th century and was never adapted for domestic use. Only the keep was in use by the 17th century as a courthouse. When this was abandoned the castle gradually became ruined until restoration work during the 20th century. The stone keep survives almost to its full height. Inside the courtyard it is possible to trace the foundations of a Great Hall, kitchens and other domestic buildings. The castle forms the backdrop to Sir Walter Scott's novel "Peveril of the Peak". The site was placed in the custody of the Office of Works in 1932 and in subsequently passed to the Department of the Environment. Since 1984 it has been in the care of English Heritage.

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Further information about monuments may be obtained by contacting Archive Services, through the English Heritage website.