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JARROW PRIORY

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  PRIORY OF ST PAUL, ST PAULS PRIORY, JARROW MONASTERY, ST PAULS MONASTERY
DESCRIPTION + /

The remains of an Anglo-Saxon and Medieval monastery, founded in 681 AD by St Benedict Biscop and King Egfrid of Northumbria. The great chronicler of the early church in England, the Venerable Bede, died there in 735. It was raided by the Vikings in 794 and in about 870 it was abandoned after being destroyed by fire. Bede's remains were transported to Durham in 1022. Jarrow was burnt by William I in 1069. The monastery was restored as a Benedictine Priory in 1072 and became a "cell" of Durham Priory in 1083. It was dissolved in 1536. During the late 18th century part of the remains were demolished. St Paul's Church with 19th century nave overlying foundations of the main Anglo-Saxon monastery church demolished in 1782. The present chancel of St Paul's Church is the early 8th century eastern chapel, originally quite separate from the main church, (see record 955160). To the south are the considerable 11th century monastic remains. At least 33 pre-Conquest carved and inscribed stones have been found on the site, dating from the late 7th century to the 11th century. These include cross fragments, grave markers and slabs, baluster friezes, and possibly fragments of church furniture. Excavations have located part of the 7th century cemetery and a boundary ditch, possibly the precinct boundary. There is also evidence of a secular settlement surrounding the monastery, (see record 26575). A number of 12th-15th century buildings associated with the monastery were also discovered. The site is in the care of English Heritage.

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Further information about monuments may be obtained by contacting Archive Services, through the English Heritage website.