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BATTLE OF HOMILDON HILL 1402

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  BATTLE OF HOMILDON HILL
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The site of the Battle of Homildon Hill is located in Akeld, Northumberland. The battle was fought on 14th September 1402 between the English and the Scottish. The Scots, taking advantage of the diversion of English arms to deal with the revolt of Owen Glendower in Wales, marched an army as far as Newcastle. Having exhausted their energies appropriating everything of value between Scotland and Newcastle, the Scots were hauling their plunder homewards when they came upon Henry Percy (senior), Earl of Northumberland, barring their escape. The Earl and his men were positioned some five miles north-west of the town of Wooler.

Realising that he had little option but to fight a battle, Douglas (the head of the Scottish army) deployed on the precipitous slopes of nearby Homindon (now Humbleton) Hill and waited for the English to attack. The Earl of Northumberland drew his army up on the plain at the base of the hill. His response was to order a large contingent of archers to ascend nearby Harehope Hill. This feature, a short distance to the north-west, rose almost to the same height as Homildon Hill. There the archers would be protected from enemy cavalry by the steep slope and yet remain within bow-range of the Scots. The Earl's remaining bowmen formed a deadly frontage for his infantry on the plain. Though Douglas's much smaller contingent of archers retaliated, there was no escape from the greater volume of English arrows. The Scots charged down the hill, only to find that although the archers retreated their fire did not slacken. The Scots army disintegrated in flight, leaving seven prominent nobles killed and over eighty barons and knights captured.

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