You are here: Home : Search : Search Results : Detailed Result
  |   Print  

SOUTHWICK PRIORY

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  THE WILDERNESS, THE SLOPES, PRIORY OF ST MARY
DESCRIPTION + /

The ruins of Southwick Priory, a priory of Augustinian Canons, built between 1145 and 1153. Southwick Priory has been traditionally regarded as having been founded in 1133 by Henry I, however research has established that the priory was actually founded a few years earlier in 1128-9, by William de Pont de l'Arche, chamberlain and sheriff of Hampshire. Between 1145 and 1153 indulgences were granted by the Archbishop of Canterbury to establish the canons at Southwick. Henry VI was married to Margaret of Anjou in the priory church in 1445. The priory was formally dissolved on 7th April 1538 as part of Henry VIII's Dissolution of the Monasteries, and the domestic buildings were converted into a house for John White. This burnt down and a completely new house, Southwick Park, was built on a separate site in the early 19th century. Some parts of the abbey ruins were maintained as a romantic garden feature or folly.

Little remains of the priory apart from a short stretch of stone wall which may have been the vaulted lower storey of a chamber attached to the Prior's lodging or part of the refectory. There are other fragments of foundations to the south of the wall and surface irregularities indicate extensive foundations. To the east of the priory is an area known as The Slopes, which are cultivation terraces and are said to be the remains of the priory's vineyard.
Excavations carried out in the 1980s have revealed a unique lavabo, probably of the late 12th century, and three graves which were probably part of the Priory cemetery. The site is in the care of English Heritage.

DETAIL + / -
MORE INFORMATION & SOURCES
+ / -
RELATED MONUMENTS + / -
MONUMENT TYPES + / -
COMMENTS + / -
Please help us keep our information accurate let us know if you see any errors on this page.

Further information about monuments may be obtained by contacting Archive Services, through the English Heritage website.