You are here: Home : Search : Search Results : Detailed Result
  |   Print  

ABBEY CHURCH OF ST PETER AND ST PAUL

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  BATH ABBEY
DESCRIPTION + /

The Abbey Church of St Peter and St Paul was built on the site of an earlier, and much larger, Norman church. Construction is often believed to have begun in 1499, however recent evidence suggests that the early 1480s may be a more accurate date. When Bishop King, Bishop of Bath and Wells, arrived in Bath in 1499 the project gained momentum, however his death in 1503 slowed its progress considerably. The Norman church remained in use until c1525 and at the time of its dissolution in 1539 it remained unfinished. In 1572 it was given to the city as its parish church and in 1574 Queen Elizabeth I visited Bath, authorising a national collection for the church's ongoing building works. It was consecrated in 1590 and the final works were carried out in the early 17th century. In 1833 and 1860-73 two major restorations were carried out by G. P. Manners and Sir George Gilbert Scott respectively. Works undertaken by Manners involved the replacement of pinnacles and addition of flying buttresses to the nave. Scott replaced the timber and plaster ceiling in the nave with originally intended fan vaulting and opened up the interior so large congregations could be accommodated. The exterior of the church is uniform in design and exists essentially as it was when completed. Its decorative features include battlements, buttresses, pinnacles and pierced parapets. The choir is three bays in length and to the aisles and clerestory are broad, five-light windows. Its eastern end is dominated by a square-framed window of seven lights, with plain, three-light windows in the aisles. The transepts, to the north and south, are relatively narrow with five-light windows in their end walls; above the north window is a clock. The west front is by far the most elaborate with a large, arched window and detailed carvings, some of which date from later restorations. The two-stage tower is broader than it is long, has two bell openings on each side and four polygonal turret pinnacles.

PICTURES + / -
DETAIL + / -
MORE INFORMATION & SOURCES
+ / -
RELATED MONUMENTS + / -
MONUMENT TYPES + / -
COMMENTS + / -
Please help us keep our information accurate let us know if you see any errors on this page.

Further information about monuments may be obtained by contacting Archive Services, through the English Heritage website.