You are here: Home : Search : Search Results : Detailed Result
  |   Print  

UNIVERSITY OF LEEDS

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  YORKSHIRE COLLEGE OF SCIENCE, LEEDS UNIVERSITY
DESCRIPTION + /

The University of Leeds began as the Yorkshire College of Science in 1874. It assumed independent university status in 1904. After 1945 it grew more rapidly than any other British university and by 2004 boasted 31,500 students. The university buildings developed in three main phases under different architectural practices; Alfred Waterhouse from 1877, Lanchester, Lucas and Lodge in the 1920s-50s, and Chamberlin, Powell and Bon in 1963-78.

The early buildings by Alfred Waterhouse, near the centre of the present site, include the School of Textiles and Design (1879), the Baines Wing (1881-5) and the Gothic Revival style Great Hall (1890-4). The Great Hall is of red brick with stone dressings and has a large perpendicular traceried window between two tall towers with pyramidal roofs and bartizans. Alfred's son, Paul, added further additions after 1902.

The buildings at the north of the present campus were built between 1924 and 1963 by Lanchester, Lucas and Lodge and their successors. These include the Brotherton Library and the monumental Parkinson Building. The former possesses a circular reading room, some 50m in diameter, with a gallery and green marble columns supporting a concrete dome. The later has its main façade at the east with a recessed portico up a wide staircase and a landmark clock tower with a pyramid roof.

The work of Chamberlin, Powell and Bon is largely to the south; a carefully drawn up master plan involving a central block of communal lecture theatres and the disposition of other departmental buildings around it. These extend down steep slopes towards the Leeds inner ring road, which was sunk underground in order to retain the link between the University, the Infirmary and the city. The buildings were based on a modular tartan grid clad with Forticrete concrete blocks and separated at intervals with beams and columns distributing the main services. Internally there were three main walkways to aid circulation around this part of the campus.

PICTURES + / -
DETAIL + / -
MORE INFORMATION & SOURCES
+ / -
RELATED MONUMENTS + / -
MONUMENT TYPES + / -
COMMENTS + / -
Please help us keep our information accurate let us know if you see any errors on this page.

Further information about monuments may be obtained by contacting Archive Services, through the Historic England website.