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BLOCK G BLETCHLEY PARK

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Block G formed part of the Government Code and Cipher School at Bletchley Park. It was constructed in October 1943 as an extension to Block F (Monument HOB UID 1525325) and to Block D (Monument HOB UID 1525316) and has a reinforced concrete frame, with steel supports in the two-storey section. The building comprises two self contained but intercommunicating elements; a single storey complex of five spurs to the west, and a two storey complex of three spurs arranged in a U-shaped formation to the east. The single-storey spurs to the west housed the ISK and ISOS sections which dealt with the decoding of Enigma and conventional cipher messages from the German secret service. These sections played a vital role in the monitoring of the reciept of false information about the plans for D Day fed by allied intelligence to the German high command. The two-storey U-shaped block to the east housed SIXTA, the Army traffic analysis sections, which dealt with the direction of radio-intercept stations and anaylsis of the enemy radio traffic. These sections played a vital role in the interception of the Enigma messages. After the departure of the Government Code and Cipher School in 1946 the building was used as a training school for the Post Office and then British Telecom. An prefabricated extension comprising three single-storey spurs was added to the southwest during the 1960s, and four detached single storey training sheds had been built to the northeast by 1976. Since the closure of this school in 1984 the building has been empty. In 1994 it became part of the Bletchley Park Trust and forms part of Bletchley Park National Codes Centre Museum.

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