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CHAIN HOME STATION CH02

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  RAF Dunkirk
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A Second World War Chain Home radar station. It was originally established in 1936 as a single tower transmitter only site, one of five Estuary Home layout stations, providing long range early warning of high flying enemy aircraft for the Thames estuary and the southeast approaches to London. In 1937 it was upgraded to a transmitter/receiver station with the addition of eight new towers. The station was enclosed within an rectangular compond defended by 3 metre high spiked steel railings and an outer flanking ditch. The internal layout follows a design standard to all East Coast stations, two rectangular buildings with blast protection known as the Receiver and Transmitter blocks. The Transmitter block had a line of four group III transmitter towers. The Receiver block also had four towers housing the receiver system. Two underground buildings contained reserve transmitter and receiver equipment. From September 1939 the site was given anti-aircraft provision, gun emplacements and pill boxes. In 1940 during the Battle of Britain it lay within RAF Fighter Command's vital 11 Group sector and it provided long range early warning of enemy attacks along the Thmaes Estuary and the south-eastern approaches to London during the battle. Following the war the station was one of 32 stations used in Operation Rotor, the first phase of restoration of Britain's air defence control and reporting system. The site was technically restored and remodelled in the early 1950s, but was closed by 1958 and all but one of the transmitter towers were demolished.

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