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SHAH JEHAN MOSQUE

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  WOKING MOSQUE, SHAH JAHAN MOSQUE
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The Shah Jehan mosque (sometimes also spelled "Jahan") was built in 1889 by W I Chambers and was the first purpose built mosque in the country. It is sometimes known simply as the Woking Mosque. It was commissioned by the noted scholar Gottlieb Wilhelm Leitner to serve as a place of worship for Muslim students from the Oriental Institute, which he had founded. The building was largely funded by the pious female Indian ruler Shah Jehan (or Jahan) of the principality of Bhopal, in central India. It is thought that also amongst early worshippers were Queen Victoria's Muslim Servants Abdul Karim and Mohammed Buksh. The building was closed for a time and rescued from dereliction by Khwaja Kamal-ud-Din, who, seeing the usefulness of such a building in close proximity to London with its Muslim community, founded a Muslim Mission here in 1913 and became the mosque's first imam. The building is square with a three bay front articulated by four panelled piers with open turrets above, linked by battlement type decoration. It is built of dressed rubble stone, with stucco facing and a copper dome with finials.

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Further information about monuments may be obtained by contacting Archive Services, through the Historic England website.