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ST NICHOLAS HOSPITAL

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  GREAT YARMOUTH NAVAL HOSPITAL, ROYAL NAVAL HOSPITAL
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St Nicholas' Hospital in Great Yarmouth was built in 1809-11 to the designs of William Pilkington under supervision of Edward Holl, Architect to the Navy Board. Also known as the Royal Naval Hospital, it was constructed from yellow brick with dressings of Portland stone and has slate roofs. The hospital was built on a quadrangle plan of single-depth wards with a chapel to the west and an isolation wing to the south. The main block is of two storeys and each of the four wings are linked by a single-storey quadrant passageway. Its north front has a central five-bay pediment over a rusticated stone entrance arch. The single storey isolation wing comprises five bays to the right and left of a projecting three-bay centrepiece. Projecting at the east and west ends under hipped roofs are two-bay wings.

The hospital was said to have accommodated those wounded in the Battle of Waterloo and was in use as a naval barracks in 1818. It became a general hospital in 1854 and some sources stipulate that in 1863 it became what was described as a 'Naval lunatic asylum' in the terminology of the day. During the Second World War the hospital was named HMS Watchful and used as a Naval information centre and administrative quarters. The hospital passed to the NHS in 1958, at which time it was renamed St Nicholas' Hospital. In 1993 the hospital closed and was converted into apartments in 1996.

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