You are here: Home : Search : Search Results : Detailed Result
  |   Print  

BURGH CASTLE

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  GARIANNVM, GARIANNUM, GARIANNONUM ROMAN FORT
DESCRIPTION + /

The ruined walls of Burgh Castle are all that remains of the Roman fort built on the site between the late 3rd and 4th century AD. The fort is trapezoidal in plan with rounded angles, and has maximum internal dimensions of around 205 by 100 metres. The walls on the north and east sides and along much of the south side are largely intact, standing to a height of around 4.6 metres and measuring up to 3 metres thick at the base. They have a core of mortared flint rubble and an external and internal facing of knapped flint and tile or brick in alternating bands. Against the outer face of the walls there are six solid bastions of pear-shaped plan spaced symmetrically, two on the south wall, one each at the north east and south east angles, one slipped from position on the north wall, and one below the south wall where it has fallen. Some or all of the west wall had collapsed before the Norman castle was constructed within the fort and nothing of it is now visible.

Between the mid seventh and ninth centuries the site was occupied by what is thought to have been a monastic settlement and in the 11th and 12th centuries a Norman motte and bailey castle existed on the site. In 1770 the mound of the castle, known as the motte, was partly removed and in 1839 it was completely levelled. The ditch was infilled in the same year and now survives only as a buried feature. On top of the motte stood a timber tower, identified through archaeological excavations, and the bailey, or courtyard, of the castle was located to the north and east of the motte.

The site is owned by Norfolk Archaeological Trust and the Roman walls are under the guardianship of English Heritage.

PICTURES + / -
DETAIL + / -
MORE INFORMATION & SOURCES
+ / -
RELATED MONUMENTS + / -
MONUMENT TYPES + / -
COMMENTS + / -
Please help us keep our information accurate let us know if you see any errors on this page.

Further information about monuments may be obtained by contacting Archive Services, through the Historic England website.