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ULEY LONG BARROW

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  HETTY PEGLERS TUMP
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Uley Long Barrow, also known as Hetty Pegler's Tump, is a Neolithic Cotswold-Severn type chambered long barrow. The barrow gained the name 'Hetty Pegler's Tump' after the 17th century owner of the field. The monument is situated on level ground on top of Crawley Hill overlooking the Severn Valley. The mound consists of small stones and earth and is trapezoidal in plan, orientated from north-east to south-west. It measures about 37 metres in length, 34 metres at its widest point and a maximum height of 3 metres. At the eastern end of the barrow there is a recess flanked by two projections of mound creating a forecourt. This leads into the entrance to the mound, which is defined by two standing stones capped by a stone lintel. Beyond the entrance is a stone gallery 10 metres long and a metre wide leading to two pairs of side chambers and an end chamber. In 1821, an excavation was carried out and uncovered human skeletons and the jaw bones of wild boar and Neolithic pottery. In addition, in close proximity to the surface of the mound, there was a single skeleton, believed to be an intrusive Romano-British burial, with three Constantinian (AD 312-337) coins. In 1854, an excavation revealed more human remains including nine human skulls as well as animal teeth and boars tusks.

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Further information about monuments may be obtained by contacting Archive Services, through the Historic England website.