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ST JOHNS HOSPITAL

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  BRACEBRIDGE ASYLUM, BRACEBRIDGE HEATH HOSPITAL, BRACEBRIDGE MENTAL HOSPITAL, LINCOLNSHIRE COUNTY PAUPER LUNATIC ASYLUM, LINCOLNSHIRE PAUPER LUNATIC ASYLUM
DESCRIPTION + /

St John's Hospital was originally the Lincolnshire Pauper lunatic asylum designed by John R. Hamilton and James Medland of Hamilton and Medland in 1848, and built in 1850-52. Additions and alterations by architect Thomas Parry and builders Young of Burslem took place in 1857-8, followed by alterations by F.H Goddard and contractors W. Pattison in 1880-82, Goddard again in 1897. Albert Edward Gough in 1901, Frederick Parker 1915, Harold S Hall 1928, A Richard and Sons of Retford in 1931.

The complex is dominated by the original three-storey superintendant's house in the main central block of the southern wing and the three storey 1901 administration block . Both are flanked by two-storey links with extensive H-plan wings to either side. The building is of an Italianate design in local 'blue' stone, with dressings of Mansfield stone, and slate, hipped roofs and many stone stacks, some of which have been reduced. The various additions made to the original asylum in 1857-8, 1880-2 and 1902 are in keeping with the style of the original building.

The hospital has several name changes, in 1919 it was known as Bracebridge Mental Hospital, in 1939 it became Bracebridge Heath Hospital, and from 1961 St John's Hospital.

It closed in 1989 and was subsequently sold for housing, some outlying buildings have been demolished.

St John's Hospital is a Grade II Listed Building. For the designation record of this site please see The National Heritage List for England.

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